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Welcome!

Bonjour et bienvenue! It is hard to believe, but I leave in just a few days for the adventure of a lifetime - a solo trip to Paris! Yes, that’s right. I am terrified of flying, yet am jetting over the Atlantic to a foreign country where the only full sentence I can speak in the native language is one made popular in a 1970s disco song (in case you live under a rock, I am referring to the infamous "voulez vous coucher avec moi ce soir" - great if you’re looking for that kind of thing, but not really helpful in my case...) Thank heavens for Xanax!
I am blessed enough to have the opportunity to live with a French family, the Joncarts, for 2 weeks and take classes at EF International Language School and explore all the nooks and crannies of Paris that the average person could care less about. My obsession with the French Revolution will be the driving force behind the places I choose to visit. I have spent the past six months researching and creating a schedule of various places to visit. I know I am an official history nerd because I am quite excited at the prospect of visiting the grave of Marat and the catacombs in which Robespierre’s bones were irreverently tossed. I may actually weep at the sight of Robespierre's final letter in the Musée Carnavalet and the grave site of my home-girl Marie Antoinette. Yes, I am lame.
I hope this blog will serve as a means of communication between my friends and family and myself during the time I am away. Look for future entries, as well as photos of my time in Paris. And please feel free to comment - a word from home would be most welcome!

Au Revoir!
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Comments

Lisa said…
Good luck! I will be thinking of you! Enjoy every second of it.. I know you will!
Jen said…
I can't wait to hear all about your trip and see all of the great photos I know you're going to take!
Aunt Barbie said…
Have a great trip, Jennifer!
Remembering the Eiffel Tower, Versailles, the gardens, the pastries, and the cafe...enjoy the time.

Your second home....Paris!

Christi
jan said…
Thank you so much for providing fresh eyes on a subject we visit in tenth grade every year - Storm the Bastille!
Bill said…
I hope that you survived the flight and all of the airline screwups! I love you and miss you already!

-Your Hubby
Tammy said…
Just checking to see how your flight was and how you managed. I love you! Have fun!!
Jerry said…
It is great to read your blog on your travels. I have subscribed to your RSS feed for updates. Sounds like such a fun adventure. Enjoy!

Jerry Geist
tammy said…
YAY! I am glad you made it safely and am amused by your misadventures already...hopefully there won't be too many more. Love you! XXXOOO
Aunt Pam said…
So happy to read you are enjoying everything - including the unexpected! Is the wine as tasty as the chocolate?
Aunt Pam said…
It's good I read your blog just before going to bed because after reading of your daily adventures, I'm exhabusted! Your feet must be very calloused by now. Luckily you have a long trip home on which to rest a bit!
Congrats on your "A"! What other grade should a teacher receive?!

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